Flemings

by janet on January 3rd, 2008

James’ parents took us to Fleming’s the day after Thanksgiving. No doubt his mom thought she was losing her fabulosity cred what with the whole T-day at Black Angus thing.

Sure could have used the mini tripod on these…

They started us out with this weird little … appetizer? Bread plate? Crudite? The white paste was a cheesy spread; the other an olive tapenade. The crostini-ish thing was crunchy but oily? And went well with neither the spread nor the tapenade? So confusing. I gave up and just settled with eating the celery and radish, confident that none of the others at the table even saw these items as food. (I was correct.)

The surprise of the night was the Fleming’s Salad with seasonal greens, candied walnuts, dried cranberries, tomatoes, and croutons. It was a surprise because James ordered it. I thought he was a one-note-caesar kind of guy (and cranberry-hater), but apparently I was wrong. The salad was just delicious – the dressing was fabulous and the candied walnuts made my eyes roll back in my head. James had to smack my hand several times as I tried to steal a majority of it.

I ordered the petit filet, medium. I don’t know when I became an adult and started to like medium instead of medium-well (or, when I was a wee child, well done). It has suspiciously coincided with my weekday-vegetarianism… I loved the bloodiest bits of this meat the best, so next time I’m going medium rare. PS – do NOT let them butterfly your filet, unless you like dry and chewy steak.

It was super yummy in a way that good beef is yummy. I learned from the esteemed Jeffery Steingarten that aging beef is a must; dry aging is far superior to wet aging and creates a more tender, more flavorful (and way more expensive due to both the loss of weight during the aging process and the high-maintenance-ness of dry aging) steak. So I asked the (super over the top) server chick whether the beef was dry- or wet- aged, and she said, “Oh, our beef is definitely wet-aged!” as if that was better. Dummy. After she left, our table laughed pretentiously, not unlike the villains in Austin Powers.

MMMMM Flemings Potaterrrrrrrrrs! It is their house specialty with cream, jalapenos, and cheddar cheese. Cream can make any dish yummy, but the jalapeno kick was an added beautiful bonus. Texturally, this was dynamite – soft and squishy at the bottom, working its way up to crispy and carmelized at the top.

We got two orders of the chocolate lava cake, one for the ‘rents to share and one for me and James to share, which meant that James totally ate the most. I love lava cake that tastes almost like a solidish pudding towards the middle – very wet and jiggly – and this was exactly that. Can someone back me up that lava cake is not the same thing as chocolate souffle? I think lava cake is a sub-category of the souffle family, but James thinks that “lava cake” is like a name brand version of the generic item “chocolate souffle.” He’s totally wrong, right?

Flemings
This one was in Victoria Gardens
Waaaay out on the 10 somewhere
California

3 Responses to “Flemings”

  1. […] We ordered two variants of dessert. Of course, the hot chocolate souffle. They all taste the same, though. Morton’s, Fleming’s, Roy’s, whatever. As a non-sweet-freakadeek, I was unmoved and instead wistfully sighed at my long-lost butterfish. […]

  2. […] of dessert. Of course, the hot chocolate souffle. They all taste the same, though. Morton’s, Fleming’s, Roy’s, whatever. As a non-sweet-freakadeek, I was unmoved and instead wistfully sighed at my […]

  3. […] fucking GOOD salads are in fancy steakhouses?  The best salad I’ve had on this earth was at Fleming’s.  And yet, they are without fail overshadowed by their flatter, squarer, bloodier brethren […]

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